A guide for handing in work for assessment.

Hand written labels are not what we expect.

A good example of a label attached to work which is clear and easy to identify.

Half peeling, hand written label says you don't care.

Labels Sellotaped down feel unconsidered.

Clear, easy to identify and considered. A good example of what we expect.

No label. It takes time to identify, meaning less time to appreciate what you have submitted.

No plastic bags please.

No plastic bags please as it feels unconsidered.

Clear, easy to identify and considered.

No canvas bags please.

Work is also labeled and easy to identify.

A guide to handing in work for Assesment

This page describes and shows what we would and would not like to see in assessment submissions. These are general rules for all submissions.

Introduction
Each module and year, presents you with different projects. It’s your task to present the work you produce in a way that allows it to communicate clearly, with the minimum of disruption or miss interpretation. As a staff team, we want to spend as much time as possible looking through the work and seeing what you have achieved. We don't appreciate searching through badly labelled work as it gets in the way of us enjoying your submission.

Ways to present your work
Each container/piece of work should be clearly labelled with the following information displayed for easy identification:
- Name
- Student Number
- Year Group
- Module
- Project

Really take your time to think about how the work is seen by the staff. The easier it is for us to appreciate the work the better. Think of the hand in as another Graphic Design project that combines all the aspects we have taught you.

Try to avoid

  • Poster Tubes are not ideal for handing in your work. Were possible try to avoid rolling up artwork. It makes it very difficult for us to get the artwork out and back without damaging it. If the artwork has been rolled up, it tends to not lay flat. We can't fully appreciate artwork that curls up.

Things to avoid

  • Hand Written labels. Please take as much care in the way your present the work as the work itself. Hand written labels suggest you have not considered how your work is identified. We go to great lengths to teach you about typography and hierarchy of information. Creating labels demonstrates this knowledge.
  • Sellotaped down or peeling labels can come unattached from the work, test your labels to avoid such problems.
  • Work submitted in plastic bags are a bad idea. They communicate the wrong messages about your work. Bin liners might be good to keep the rain off your work as you travel, but they have no place in surrounding your submission. Unless of course your saying your work is rubbish? The same goes for shopping bags, leave those away from your beautifully designed work, its not appropriate.
  • Canvas / Ikea bags, again are useful for transporting your work. However, they are not appropriate for submitting your work.